On-surface Synthesis: What Happens Behind the Scenes?

Authors

  • Samuel Stolz Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, United States https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3597-680X
  • Marco Di Giovannantonio Istituto di Struttura della Materia, CNR, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma, Italy https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8658-9183
  • Oliver Gröning Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, nanotech@surfaces, Überlandstrasse 129, CH -8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland
  • Roland Widmer Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, nanotech@surfaces, Überlandstrasse 129, CH -8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9226-3136

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.2533/chimia.2022.203

Keywords:

temperature programmed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, TP-XPS, aryl-aryl coupling, Dehalogenation, On-surface synthesis

Abstract

On-surface synthesis has become a powerful approach to produce low-dimensional carbon-based nanostructures with atomistic precision. A large variety of analytical tools and methods are available to provide efficient monitoring of on-surface reactions, among which, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has proven to be particularly efficient to characterize reaction intermediates and products down to the atomic scale. Nevertheless, due to limited temporal resolution, difficulties to explore the full temperature range, and lack of identifying the chemical environment of all elements involved in on-surface processes, SPM is ideally complemented with temperature programmed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TP-XPS). In this short review, we aim to unveil some of the capabilities of synchrotron based TP-XPS reporting on our own research on Ullmann-type on-surface coupling reactions.

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Published

2022-03-30

How to Cite

[1]
S. Stolz, M. Di Giovannantonio, O. Gröning, R. Widmer, Chimia 2022, 76, 203, DOI: 10.2533/chimia.2022.203.