Getting it Right: How DNA Polymerases Select the Right Nucleotide

Authors

  • Samra Ludmann Department of Chemistry Konstanz Research School Chemical Biology University of Konstanz Universitätsstrasse 10 78457 Konstanz, Germany
  • Andreas Marx Department of Chemistry Konstanz Research School Chemical Biology University of Konstanz Universitätsstrasse 10 78457 Konstanz, Germany. andreas.marx@uni-konstanz.de

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.2533/chimia.2016.203

Keywords:

Dna polymerases, Dna replication, Hydrogen bonding, Modified nucleotides, Selectivity of dna polymerases

Abstract

All living organisms are defined by their genetic code encrypted in their DNA. DNA polymerases are the enzymes that are responsible for all DNA syntheses occurring in nature. For DNA replication, repair and recombination these enzymes have to read the parental DNA and recognize the complementary nucleotide out of a pool of four structurally similar deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) for a given template. The selection of the nucleotide is in accordance with the Watson-Crick rule. In this process the accuracy of DNA synthesis is crucial for the maintenance of the genome stability. However, to spur evolution a certain degree of freedom must be allowed. This brief review highlights the mechanistic basis for selecting the right nucleotide by DNA polymerases.

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Published

2016-03-30

How to Cite

[1]
S. Ludmann, A. Marx, Chimia 2016, 70, 203, DOI: 10.2533/chimia.2016.203.

Issue

Section

Scientific Articles